Tactical and Technical Trends #34

The U.S. intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 34, September 1943 have been added to the main Lone Sentry website:

The Me-410 Aircraft  ◊  Protection Against Japanese Aerial Bombing  ◊  General von Arnim’s Orders for Ground Deployment  ◊  Italian L Type Grenade  ◊  German Conversion of French 75s into Antitank Guns  ◊  Japanese 70-mm Howitzer Model 92  ◊  Notes on German Artillery Tactics in Tunisia  ◊  Russian Artillery Support in Tank Attacks  ◊  Notes of a British Armored Force Officer on German Tank Employment  ◊  Detailed Report on the German “Tiger” PzKw 6  ◊  Italian Portable Flame Thrower, Model 41  ◊  German Compass Card  ◊  German Butterfly Bomb  ◊  Notes on the German Infantry Division  ◊  Notes on Mobile Surgical Units in the Middle East  ◊  Axis Use of Skoda AA/AT Gun  ◊  Testing Antiaircraft Gun Barrels in Combat Areas  ◊  Japanese 12.7-mm (Fixed Mount) Aircraft Machine Gun  ◊  German Recognition Signals  ◊  Drinking Water from the Rattan Vine  ◊  Lessons from the New Zealand Division Operations in Cyrenaica

 

Pantiger

When the Allied forces first encountered the Tiger II in Normandy in the summer of 1944, the panzer was briefly referred to as the “Pantiger”. The Associated Press picked up the name “Pantiger” in their article on August 19th:

Germans have thrown a huge new, heavily armored tank into action on both the Russian and northern French fronts in an effort to stem the Allied advances, but first reports denied it was a “super weapon.”

One of the new monsters weighing over 65 tons and with six inch armor plate—an inch and a half thicker than anything the enemy yet has put into action—was taken by the British on the Orne river front. The tank was a victim of a mechanical breakdown and never had fired a shot in battle.

Christened the “Pantiger” by its captors, the tank combines the best features of the Nazi Tiger and Panther tanks, which weigh 45 tons each. It is 23 feet long and over 11 feet wide, has an extra wheel on each side of its tracks and a huge, clumsy looking turret.

The name “Pantiger” was still being used as late as the publication of Tactical and Technical Trends, October 1944.

PANTIGER, A REDESIGNED TIGER, NEWEST ENEMY HEAVY TANK

A new 67-ton German heavy tank—referred to variously as Pantiger and Tiger II—has been employed against the Allies this summer in France. Actually a redesigned Tiger (Pz. Kpfw. VI), it mounts the 8.8-cm Kw. K. 43 gun. On the basis of a preliminary report, the general appearance of the new tank is that of a scaled-up Pz. Kpfw. V (Panther) on the wide Tiger tracks. It conforms to normal German tank practice insofar as the design, lay-out, welding, and interlocking of the main plates are concerned. All sides are sloping. The gun is larger than the Panther gun, and longer than the ordinary Tiger gun. Armor is also thicker than that on either the Panther or the Tiger. The turret is of new design, with bent side plates. In all respects the new tank is larger than the standard Tiger.

Pantiger

 

Tactical and Technical Trends #12

The U.S. military intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 12, November 1942 have been added to the main website:

German Aircraft Cannons  ◊  The German Rescue Buoy  ◊  Antiaircraft Defense of Motor Columns on the March  ◊  Japanese Antiaircraft Guns  ◊  Italian 90-mm Multipurpose Gun  ◊  Soviet Antitank Defense  ◊  Armor Penetration of German Antitank Guns  ◊  German Schwere Wurfgerät 40  ◊  German 105-mm Gun  ◊  305-mm Skoda Coast Defense Gun  ◊  210-mm German and Italian Howitzers  ◊  German Self-Propelled 150-mm Howitzer  ◊  Japanese Incendiary Bombs  ◊  Nitrogen Mustard Gases  ◊  Demolition Charge for 20-mm AA/AT Gun  ◊  Winter Fighting in Russia  ◊  German Tactics in the Final Phases at Kharkov  ◊  Crew and Communications of German Mark IV Tank  ◊  Security Measures of a German Armored Division  ◊  Enemy Practices Used in Interrogating Prisoners of War  ◊  Italian Measures for Concealing a Withdrawal  ◊  Operations of the German Tank Recovery Platoon  ◊  Propeller-Driven Sleds  ◊  Report of Italian Pilot on “Crows Feet”  ◊  Markings on German Motor-Maintenance Vehicles  ◊  German Methods Against Russian Winter Conditions  ◊  Katakana (Phonetic Japanese) Used in Communications

 

Tactical and Technical Trends #43

The intel articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 43, January 1944 have been added to the main Lone Sentry website:

Tactical and Technical Trends #41

The U.S. military intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 41, December 1943 have been added to the main website:

Tactical and Technical Trends #38

The U.S. military intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 38, November 1943 have been added to the main website:

Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 10

The articles from “Tactical and Technical Trends” No. 10 have been added to main Lone Sentry site. Issue No. 10 was published in October 1942 and covers both Allied and enemy forces. Particularly interesting articles from the issue include:

Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 9

“Tactical and Technical Trends” No. 9 (October 8, 1942) has been added to the main site. Interesting articles include:

Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 8

The articles from “Tactical and Technical Trends”  No. 8 have been added to main site.  “Tactical and Technical Trends” was published by the Military Intelligence Service of the War Department to inform U.S. forces of both Allied and enemy military developments.  At the time of publication, September 1942, the articles were necessarily based primarily on reports from British and Russian sources supplemented by enemy publications and training materials.

Noteworthy articles from Issue No. 8 include:

German airborne forces and the attack on Crete were a major focus of the issue.