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WWII in HD

New Soviet Artillery Crew from MiniArt

New WWII Russian artillery figures set has been announced by MiniArt: No. 35185: SOVIET HEAVY ARTILLERY CREW. The kit contains models of five figures with new heads, ammunition boxes, shells, and weapons.

soviet-artillery-crew-35185

 

12-Inch Mortar M1912

Description and characteristics of the 12-inch Mortar M1912 from TM 9-458: 12-inch Mortar M1912 Mounted on 12-inch Mortar Carriage M1896MIII, U.S. War Department Technical Manual, Washington, D.C., August 1942.

12-inch Mortar M1912 Mounted on 12-inch Mortar Carriage M1896MIII

Characteristics.

These 12-inch mortars are comparatively short-barreled weapons able to fire in all directions (360° traverse) but only at high angles of elevation. The maximum elevation attainable is approximately 65°. The minimum elevation (just clearing the emplacement walls) is 45°. The weapon must be depressed to 0° between rounds for loading. These mortars are no longer manufactured.

FIGURE 1.--12-inch mortar M1912 on mortar carriage M1896MIII.

FIGURE 1.–12-inch mortar M1912 on mortar carriage M1896MIII.

Continue reading 12-Inch Mortar M1912

Mark 24 Naval Gun Mount

Illustration of the Mark 24 3"/50 cal. naval gun mount from: Naval Ordnance and Gunnery, NAVPERS 16116, Bureau of Naval Personnel, Training Division, May 1944.

3"/50 cal. gun and Mark 24 mount.

3"/50 cal. gun and Mark 24 mount.

 

Verlinden 88mm Flak/Pak Crew

Verlinden Productions has announced on their Facebook page a new WWII German kit for July:
Item #2769: 88mm Flak/Pak Crew-Ammo-Gear 1:35 Scale. Price is $34.95 online. 88mm gun not included.

#2769: 88mm Flak/Pak Crew-Ammo-Gear 1:35 Scale

#2769: 88mm Flak/Pak Crew-Ammo-Gear 1:35 Scale


 

Russian Antitank Guns

Russian Antitank Guns of WW2

Our Red Army Ally, War Department Pamphlet No. 21-30, 1945.


 

Bofors Guns Concealment in Dummy Tent

Bofors Guns Concealment Dummy Tent

Source: Engineer-in-Chief’s Consolidated Intelligence Summary, Nos. 1-17, Headquarters, Australian Military Forces, May 1944.
 

60mm Mortar Practice Shell

Illustration of 60-mm mortar practice shell from the U.S. WW2 technical manual: TM 9-1901: Artillery Ammunition, War Department Technical Manual, June 1944:

60mm Mortar Blue Practice Shell WW2 U.S.
 

81. SHELL, PRACTICE, M50A2, W /FUZE, P.D., M52, 60-MM MORTARS, M1 and M2, COMPLETE ROUND (fig. 59), is a practice round provided for the 60-mm mortars by adapting service items for this purpose. Components of the M50A2 Practice Round are the same as are used in the M49A2 Service Round except for the high-explosive shell filler. The M50A2 Projectile has a filler of inert material (plaster of paris and stearic acid) and a black powder pellet (0.05 lb) loaded adjacent to the booster of the M52 Fuze. The M52 Fuze is a superquick fuze and shell is functioned before penetration occurs. The black powder pellet and booster charge provide a spotting charge for observation purposes. The shell is loaded to the same weight as the service round, thereby providing for the same ballistic values.

DATA

   With M52
or M52B2 Fuze
  With M52B1
(Plastic) Fuze
Weight of complete round       2.96 lb    2.80 lb
Length of complete round     9.54 in.  9.54 in.
Muzzle velocity     518 ft per sec*  535 ft per sec*
Maximum range (at 45 deg)     1.984 yd*  2,017 yd*
*–For charge 4 (cartridge plus 4 increments).
 

Japanese Model 88 75-mm AA Gun

Description of the WWII Japanese Model 88 (1928) 75-mm Antiaircraft Gun from Japanese Field Artillery, Special Series No. 25, Military Intelligence Division, U.S. War Department, Washington, D.C., October 15, 1944.

Model 88 (1928) 75-mm AA Gun.

Model 88 (1928) 75-mm AA gun is the standard Japanese mobile antiaircraft artillery weapon. It has been encountered more generally in U.S. campaigns against the Japanese than any other artillery weapon. It has a high velocity which makes it suitable for use against ground targets, especially armor. It has been used both in defense of airfields against ground attack and in a dual-purpose role as an antiaircraft and coast-defense gun. For antitank purposes it has the advantage of all-round traverse and the disadvantage of limited mobility. It thus can be quite effective when fired from ambush against tanks, but it cannot shoot and run.

Continue reading Japanese Model 88 75-mm AA Gun

Destruction of Artillery Ammunition

Instructions for destruction of artillery ammunition to prevent capture by the enemy — the methods will require imagination, initiative, and ingenuity. Source: TM 9-1901: Artillery Ammunition, U.S. War Department Technical Manual, June 1944.

DESTRUCTION OF AMMUNITION UPON IMMINENCE OF CAPTURE IN COMBAT ZONE

387. GENERAL.

a. When immediate capture of ammunition is threatened by a turn of events in the combat zone and when the ammunition cannot be evacuated, it will be as completely destroyed or damaged as available time, equipment, materials, and personnel will permit.

b. The destruction of ammunition will be accomplished only on authority delegated by the division or higher commander.

c. The methods used will require imagination, initiative, and ingenuity, and should be the simplest which will accomplish the desired purpose.

388. METHODS.

a. Ammunition can be destroyed most quickly by detonation or burning.

(1) DETONATION. Unpacked high-explosive rounds, separate-loading high-explosive shell, and high capacity items such as antitank mines, bangalore torpedoes, bursters or caps, packed or unpacked, may be destroyed by placing them in contact in piles and detonating them with a charge of TNT, using with blasting cap and sufficient safety fuse to permit reaching cover at 200 yards. About 1 pound of TNT per 100 pounds of ammunition as packed, should be sufficient,

(2) BURNING. All other types of ammunition such as packed high-explosive rounds and propelling charges, small-arms ammunition, grenades, pyrotechnics, etc., packed or unpacked, can most rapidly be destroyed by burning. The ammunition may be piled in the containers (except small-arms cartridges which should be broken out) with all available inflammable material as wood, rags, brush, and cans or drums of gasoline. The gasoline should be poured over the pile and ignited from cover. Rounds that come through the fire unexploded will be in the nature of duds, that is, in a condition dangerous to handle.

 

Third Army Antiaircraft Claims

Approved claims for U.S. Third Army antiaircraft units from Antiaircraft Artillery: A Brief History of Operations in Europe, 1 August 1944 to 8 May, 1945, Third United States Army.

ANNEX B: Approved claims for all enemy aircraft destroyed or damaged, 1 August 1944 to 8 May 1945, while units listed were serving with the Third US Army. This tabulation does not include a great many additional aircraft claimed, and earned, while units were detached from Third US Army and serving elsewhere. Units not listed made no claims under the Army.

Continue reading Third Army Antiaircraft Claims