Tactical and Technical Trends #34

The U.S. intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 34, September 1943 have been added to the main Lone Sentry website:

The Me-410 Aircraft  ◊  Protection Against Japanese Aerial Bombing  ◊  General von Arnim’s Orders for Ground Deployment  ◊  Italian L Type Grenade  ◊  German Conversion of French 75s into Antitank Guns  ◊  Japanese 70-mm Howitzer Model 92  ◊  Notes on German Artillery Tactics in Tunisia  ◊  Russian Artillery Support in Tank Attacks  ◊  Notes of a British Armored Force Officer on German Tank Employment  ◊  Detailed Report on the German “Tiger” PzKw 6  ◊  Italian Portable Flame Thrower, Model 41  ◊  German Compass Card  ◊  German Butterfly Bomb  ◊  Notes on the German Infantry Division  ◊  Notes on Mobile Surgical Units in the Middle East  ◊  Axis Use of Skoda AA/AT Gun  ◊  Testing Antiaircraft Gun Barrels in Combat Areas  ◊  Japanese 12.7-mm (Fixed Mount) Aircraft Machine Gun  ◊  German Recognition Signals  ◊  Drinking Water from the Rattan Vine  ◊  Lessons from the New Zealand Division Operations in Cyrenaica

 

Small Wurzberg German Radar

Report on the German “Small Wurzburg” radar from U.S. Naval Intelligence report Japanese Electronics, March 1945:

The “Small Wurzburg” or “Bowlfire” was first designed in 1936, and is one of the most efficient Radars. It is primarily for A.A. fire control but has been used for A/C reporting, searchlight control, and as a standby for Ground Control of A/C. In general, it is a mobile Radar, mounted on a four-wheeled trailer with outriggers for levelling. Some sets are emplaced, however, and the wheels removed.

Search is by mechanical rotation of the apparatus for bearing and by elevation of the reflector bowl for height measurement.

The diameter of the paraboloid reflector is 10 feet, the top of which is but 12½ feet above the ground. A cupboard, housing the radar equipment, and an operators seat are attached to the rear and side of the reflector.

Small Wurzburg German Radar

There are several types of Small Wurzburgs; among them Types “A”, “C”, and “D” are most used and are quite similar. Type “D” is found with limber mounting and may be without wheels or even set in concrete.

For transport, the paraboloid can be split, by hinges, and turned down in two halves.

Type F.M.G. 41-T is a modification of the Small Wurzburg which incorporates a scoop-like form for cutting out ground echoes.

The practical range of the Small Wurzburg is not more than 25 nautical miles but it has a high degree of accuracy for Fire Control purposes.

Tactical and Technical Trends #12

The U.S. military intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 12, November 1942 have been added to the main website:

German Aircraft Cannons  ◊  The German Rescue Buoy  ◊  Antiaircraft Defense of Motor Columns on the March  ◊  Japanese Antiaircraft Guns  ◊  Italian 90-mm Multipurpose Gun  ◊  Soviet Antitank Defense  ◊  Armor Penetration of German Antitank Guns  ◊  German Schwere Wurfgerät 40  ◊  German 105-mm Gun  ◊  305-mm Skoda Coast Defense Gun  ◊  210-mm German and Italian Howitzers  ◊  German Self-Propelled 150-mm Howitzer  ◊  Japanese Incendiary Bombs  ◊  Nitrogen Mustard Gases  ◊  Demolition Charge for 20-mm AA/AT Gun  ◊  Winter Fighting in Russia  ◊  German Tactics in the Final Phases at Kharkov  ◊  Crew and Communications of German Mark IV Tank  ◊  Security Measures of a German Armored Division  ◊  Enemy Practices Used in Interrogating Prisoners of War  ◊  Italian Measures for Concealing a Withdrawal  ◊  Operations of the German Tank Recovery Platoon  ◊  Propeller-Driven Sleds  ◊  Report of Italian Pilot on “Crows Feet”  ◊  Markings on German Motor-Maintenance Vehicles  ◊  German Methods Against Russian Winter Conditions  ◊  Katakana (Phonetic Japanese) Used in Communications

 

Tactical and Technical Trends #43

The intel articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 43, January 1944 have been added to the main Lone Sentry website:

Tactical and Technical Trends #41

The U.S. military intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 41, December 1943 have been added to the main website:

Tactical and Technical Trends #38

The U.S. military intelligence articles from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 38, November 1943 have been added to the main website:

From Bayonet to Heavy Artillery

This illustration from Tactical and Technical Trends shows the primary weapons of the WWII German infantry division according to range — from the lowly bayonet (15½ in.) to the divisional artillery (20,000 yds.)
Weapons of the German Infantry Division

Weapons of the German Infantry Division (click to enlarge)

WEAPONS OF THE GERMAN INFANTRY DIVISION
Based on a sketch prepared by the Military Intelligence Training Center, Camp Ritchie, Maryland

LEGEND:

1: SEITENGEWEHR (BAYONET)

  • Length – 15 1/2
  • Carried by all riflemen

2: HANDGRANATE (HAND GRENADE)

  • Delay Fuse – 4 1/2 sec
  • Danger Radius – 20 yds
  • Variable number per rifleman

3: PISTOLE (PISTOL)

  • Cal – .35
  • Semi-Automatic
  • Carried by personnel who do not carry rifle or submachine gun

4: MASCHINENPISTOLE (SUB MACHINE GUN)

  • Cal – .35 – Automatic
  • Eff Range – to 200 yds
  • Used by small unit leaders and company commander

5: GEWEHR 98K (RIFLE)

  • Cal – .31
  • Eff Range – 400 yds
  • Six per squad

6: LEICHTES MASCHINENGEWEHR 34 (LIGHT MACHINE GUN)

  • Cal – .31
  • Eff Range – 800 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 100/150 rpm
  • One per squad
  • (Model 42 now being manufactured)

7: LEICHTER GRANATWERFER (50-mm MORTAR)

  • Eff Range – 350 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 6 rds in 9 sec
  • Danger Radius – 25 yds
  • One per platoon

8: PANZERBUCHSE 39 (AT RIFLE)

  • Cal – .31
  • Eff Range – 200 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 6/8 rpm
  • Three per rifle company

9: SCHWERES MASCHINENGEWEHR 34 (HEAVY MACHINE GUN)

  • Cal – .31
  • Eff Range – 1,500 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 350 rpm
  • Twelve per MG Co
  • (Same as LMG except for mount)

10: SCHWERER GRANATWERFER (81-mm MORTAR)

  • Eff Range – 1,200 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 20/25 rpm
  • Danger Radius 35 yds
  • Six per MG Company

11: 3.7 cm PAK (37-mm AT GUN)

  • Eff Range – 800 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 15 rpm
  • Twelve per AT Co in Infantry Regiment

12: 5 cm PAK (50-mm AT GUN)

  • Eff Range – 1,000 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 16 rpm
  • Eighteen per AT
  • Battalion in Infantry Division

13: 7.5 cm LEICHTES INF GESCHUTZ (75-mm INF HOWITZER)

  • Max Range – 3,900 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 10/20 rpm
  • Six per Howitzer Company in Infantry Regiment

14: 15 cm SCHWERES INF GESCHUTZ (150-mm INF HOWITZER)

  • Max Range – 6,000 yds
  • Rate of Fire – 5 rpm
  • Two per Howitzer Company in Infantry Regiment

15: 10.5 cm LEICHTE FELDHAUBITZE (105-mm GUN HOWITZER)

  • Max Range – 12,000 yds
  • Twelve per light battalion in Division Artillery

16: 15 cm SCHWERE FELDHAUBITZE (150-mm HOWITZER)

  • Max Range – 10,500 yds
  • Eight per medium battalion in Division Artillery

17: 10 cm KANONE (105-mm GUN)

  • Max Range – 20,000 yds
  • Four per medium battalion in Division Artillery

Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 10

The articles from “Tactical and Technical Trends” No. 10 have been added to main Lone Sentry site. Issue No. 10 was published in October 1942 and covers both Allied and enemy forces. Particularly interesting articles from the issue include:

Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 9

“Tactical and Technical Trends” No. 9 (October 8, 1942) has been added to the main site. Interesting articles include:

Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 8

The articles from “Tactical and Technical Trends”  No. 8 have been added to main site.  “Tactical and Technical Trends” was published by the Military Intelligence Service of the War Department to inform U.S. forces of both Allied and enemy military developments.  At the time of publication, September 1942, the articles were necessarily based primarily on reports from British and Russian sources supplemented by enemy publications and training materials.

Noteworthy articles from Issue No. 8 include:

German airborne forces and the attack on Crete were a major focus of the issue.