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GAZ Model 1938 Kit from MiniArt

Another kit in process announcement from MiniArt covering a Russian bus from WWII in 1/35th-scale: No. 35149: GAZ-03-30 Mod. 1938.

gaz-model-1938

According to MiniArt, features of the kit include 396 plastic parts; 9 PE parts; 30 clear plastic parts; decals for ten marking variants; full-color instructions; highly-detailed chassis; accurate engine; and all doors can be assembled open or closed.

 

M26 Driver’s Controls

Diagrams of the driver’s compartment on the M26 armored tractor from TM 9-767: 40-Ton Tank Transporter Truck-Trailer M25, War Department Technical Manual, U.S. War Department, February 1944.

dragon-wagon-instrument-panel-drivers-controls

A–WINDSHIELD THUMB SCREW
B–SPEEDOMETER
C–AMMETER
D–INSTRUMENT PANEL LIGHT
E–TACHOMETER
F–OIL TEMPERATURE GAGE
G–TACHOMETER TELLTALE LOCK
H–FLOODLIGHT SWITCH
J–FUEL GAGE (RIGHT FUEL TANK)
K–WINDSHIELD WIPER
L–WINDSHIELD WIPER SWITCH
M–AIR HORN BUTTON
N–HAND THROTTLE LEVER
P–CHOKE LEVER
Q–RADIATOR FILLER CAP COVER
R–ENGINE EOMPARTMENT SIDE COVER (DOOR)
S–TURNBUCKLE
T–SIREN LIGHT SWITCH
U–BLACKOUT DRIVING LIGHT SWITCH
V–STARTER SWITCH
W–IGNITION SWITCHES
X–AUXILIARY TRANSMISSION SHIFT LEVER
Y–MAIN TRANSMISSION SHIFT LEVER
Z–RIGHT AIR BRAKE HAND CONTROL
AA–TRAILER BRAKE HAND CONTROL
AB–FRONT AXLE DECLUTCH LEVER
AC–ENGINE VENTILATOR
AD–FUEL TANK CHANGE-OVER VALVE
AE–ACCELERATOR PEDAL
AF–BRAKE PEDAL
AG–LIGHT SWITCH
AH–OIL PRESSURE GAGE
AJ–LEFT AIR BRAKE HAND CONTROL
AK–HEADLIGHT DIMMER SWITCH
AL–WINDSHIELD RACK
AM–CLUTCH PEDAL
AN–HAND BRAKE LEVER
AP–SIREN SWITCH
AQ–WINDSHIELD RACK
AR–WATER TEMPERATURE GAGE
AS–INSTRUMENT PANEL LIGHT SWITCH
AT–AIR PRESSURE GAGE
AU–CANTEEN
AV–FUEL GAGE (LEFT FUEL TANK)
AW–WINDSHIELD
AX–CHAIN AND WING SCREW FOR INSTRUMENT PANEL

 

The Secret of the Russians’ Success

Secret of Russian Success, Preventive Maintenance

Army Motors, March 1945


 

Vehicle Paint Problems

Vehicle paint problems from Army Motors, Vol. 6, No. 5, August 1945.

Jeep Paint Markings

Dear Half-Mast,

We’ve had a lot of trouble with gasoline-soluble paint, used to paint the large service command insignia on administrative vehicles and the national symbol on tactical vehicles. The nomenclature is Paint, gasoline-soluble, lusterless (paste), white; Fed. Stock No. 52-P-2732. This problem came to a head at our last inspection by the CG, who was able to wipe the things off by hand. We’ve also found that rain causes them to run and wash away or fade.

How can we prevent this?

— Lt. R. W. G.

 

Dear Lieutenant,

It’s now okay to use Enamel, synthetic, stenciling, lusterless, white (Fed. Stock No. 52-E-8400-275) for the star on all motor vehicles assigned to tactical units and AGF installations, and on administrative vehicles in theaters of operations as directed by the theater commander. Says so in AR 850-5 (15 Feb. 45).

This white enamel should also be used for registration numbers. If yours are still blue, AR 850-5 says repaint ’em by 15 Aug. 45.

For any other national symbol, as directed by the Commanding General, ASF, for vehicles assigned to service command installations, gasoline-soluble paint will still be used. Likewise for unit identification markings, tactical markings, and weight-class markings—which ain’t necessarily permanent.

— Half-Mast

 

Disruptive Camouflage of Vehicles

How useful is disruptive camouflage on tanks and military vehicles? The following excerpt on camouflage is taken from the A Military Encyclopedia Based on Operations in the Italian Campaigns 1943-1945 by the G-3 Section, Headquarters 15th Army Group, Italy. The encyclopedia was designed to compile the knowledge gained by experience in operations in Italy by the 15th Army Group, including both the U.S. Fifth Army and the British Eighth Army.

Camouflage of Vehicles – Disruptive Painting

The general consensus of opinion among camouflage officers was that pattern painting was of dubious value because:

a. Varied terrain in Italy made standard patterns and colors impracticable.

b. When a unit was shifted from one sector to another, as was often necessary, their patterns and colors were revealing rather than concealing. Repainting before a move was nearly always impossible because of insufficient time.

c. Security was lost and units easily identified when units moved to different sectors.

d. Camouflage paints and personnel for supervision were often not available.

As a result of extensive study and experiment, all disruptive painting of vehicles in this theater was discontinued, except where specifically directed for a particular operation. The British discarded pattern painting of vehicles in favor of a lusterless olive drab.

New Zealand M4 Sherman Tank in Italy during WW2

Photograph of a New Zealand M4 Sherman tank showing a disruptive camouflage pattern.

New Zealand M4 Sherman Tank and Crew - WW2

Another view of the same New Zealand Sherman tank and its crew from a U.S. veteran's photo album in the website's collection.

 

Germans Surrender in Czechoslovakia

U.S. Army video of German troops surrendering in Czechoslovakia in 1945:

  • Part 1 — German soldiers, wagons, and trucks surrender. U.S. soldiers inspect abandoned German equipment and artillery. Wehrmacht soldiers in a Schwimmwagen are directed forward by U.S. soldiers.
  • Part 2 — German general discusses surrender with American officers. German prisoners, including several women, are loaded into an American truck.
  • Part 3 — German prisoners march through town to assembly point. German bicycle troops move past. German prisoners assembled. German vehicle and artillery dump.
  • Part 4 — Surrendered German horses, wagon, and trucks. Men of the U.S. 97th Infantry Division.
  • Part 5 — American jeeps pass column of German vehicles. German vehicles assembled in a field. German columns, including Sdkfz 250 and Sdkfz. 251 halftracks, move past civilians in a town.

WW2 Kubelwagen German Artillery Surrenders German Column WW2 German Motorcycle Rider German WW2 Wagons Krupp Protze Officers of 97th Infantry Division Sdkfz 250 Halftrack Sdkfz 251. Halftrack Surrender Wehrmacht Cars Wehrmacht Surrender

 

Captured Jeeps

Jeep Captured by Germans in WW2

Fallschirmjäger inspect a captured American Jeep and trailer. A German amphibious Volkswagen Schwimmwagen is parked in the background. (Creative Commons: Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-584-2159-27 / Reich / CC-BY-SA)

Beute Amerikanischer Jeep - Wehrmacht WWII

Wehrmacht panzer troops with a captured American Jeep in Northern France during the Summer of 1944. (Creative Commons: Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-301-1970-33 / Hasse / CC-BY-SA)

Captured Jeep

In the same location as above, German soldiers point out the U.S. marking for the cameraman. (Creative Commons: Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-301-1970-34 / Hasse / CC-BY-SA)

Captured Russian Jeep, Eastern Front, WW2

German soldiers in a captured Soviet jeep on the Eastern Front. (Creative Commons: Bundesarchiv, Bild 169-0938 / Unknown / CC-BY-SA)

 

Dodge WC54 Ambulance

Mig Productions Dodge WC54 Ambulance

Dodge WC54 Ambulance

 
MIG Productions is adding a resin 1/48th scale Dodge WC54 Ambulance kit to their lineup. The Dodge WC54 ambulance was a 3/4-ton 4×4 light truck which served as the main ambulance vehicle used by the U.S. Army during WWII. Following WWII, the Dodge WC54 saw action in Korea and served with France, Greece, Austria, Belgium, Norway and Netherlands. The MIG Productions resin kit includes interior detailing, photo-etched parts, and transparent plastic parts for the windshields. Clear colored step-by-step instructions and decals are also included.
Mig Productions U.S. 3/4-ton Dodge WC51 Weapons Carrier

Dodge WC51 Weapons Carrier

 
This kit should make a nice addition to MIG Productions’ 1/48th resin kit of the U.S. 3/4-ton Dodge WC 51 weapon carrier.