Jeep Sling

Instructions for making a jeep lift bar from the 881st Ordnance HAM Company, from Army Motors, July 1945.

JEEP SLING
TO GIVE 1/4-TONS A LIFT WITHOUT ALSO GIVING ‘EM A PAIN IN THE REAR END

Ordinarily, when you evacuate a helpless jeep and have to lift it on or off a cargo truck with your wrecker, the victim is hoisted by wrapping a chain around it. This gets it where it’s going. But often the jeep is in even worse shape when you’re through because the chain damages the body. To prevent a lot of unnecessary repair work, the 881st Ord. HAM Co. got busy and devised a simple sling that holds the jeep firmly but never leaves a mark.

Jeep Sling Figure 2

The sling is made of a reinforced 6″ I-beam, a chain with a hook at one end, two chains with hooks on the other end, and two heavy metal rings near the center of the beam. You reinforce the I-beam on both sides, preferably with U-channel iron if you’ve got it; otherwise use plate. It’s better not to extend these reinforcements along the beam’s full length or it’ll increase the sling’s weight considerably. Instead, you can place one at each end and overlap them in the center for added strength under the ring holes.

In case you can’t find an I-beam, two pieces of frame side-rail bolted or welded together will do just as well and you won’t have to bother to reinforce it. You’ll find the exact dimensions for building the sling in Fig. 1.

Jeep Sling Figure 1

To put this sling to work, first lower the top and windshield of the 1/4-ton and see that the rear seat is level with the back edge of the body. Then place the I-beam lengthwise over the jeep with the single-chain end to the rear (Fig. 2). Hook the single chain in the pintle, or if there isn’t any, under the rear edge of the frame. Then hook the other two chains under the two frame-ends supporting the front bumper. After you place the wrecker hook through the center rings, you can gently lift the jeep to where you want it with nary a slip.

 

How’s Your Dodge, Rog?

“How’s Your Dodge, Rog?” from Army Motors, Chief of Ordnance, August 1944.

Hows Your Dodge, Rog?
 

Vehicle Paint Problems

Vehicle paint problems from Army Motors, Vol. 6, No. 5, August 1945.

Jeep Paint Markings

Dear Half-Mast,

We’ve had a lot of trouble with gasoline-soluble paint, used to paint the large service command insignia on administrative vehicles and the national symbol on tactical vehicles. The nomenclature is Paint, gasoline-soluble, lusterless (paste), white; Fed. Stock No. 52-P-2732. This problem came to a head at our last inspection by the CG, who was able to wipe the things off by hand. We’ve also found that rain causes them to run and wash away or fade.

How can we prevent this?

— Lt. R. W. G.

 

Dear Lieutenant,

It’s now okay to use Enamel, synthetic, stenciling, lusterless, white (Fed. Stock No. 52-E-8400-275) for the star on all motor vehicles assigned to tactical units and AGF installations, and on administrative vehicles in theaters of operations as directed by the theater commander. Says so in AR 850-5 (15 Feb. 45).

This white enamel should also be used for registration numbers. If yours are still blue, AR 850-5 says repaint ’em by 15 Aug. 45.

For any other national symbol, as directed by the Commanding General, ASF, for vehicles assigned to service command installations, gasoline-soluble paint will still be used. Likewise for unit identification markings, tactical markings, and weight-class markings—which ain’t necessarily permanent.

— Half-Mast

 

Take the “HE” Out of Summer’s Heat

“Take the ‘HE’ out of summer’s HEAT!” from Army Motors, Vol. 6, No. 3, June 1945.

Take the HE out of summer's HEAT!

Hot weather can stop your vehicle just as dead as a burst of hot steel—it takes a bit longer, that’s all. Summer-wise GI’s will bear down early and often on vital items like these:

  • COOLING SYSTEM—Drain antifreeze, flush system, install rust inhibitor. Check cylinder-head and filler-cap gaskets, thermostat, fan belt, pressure-relief valve, hose connections. Police up that radiator core. Look for leaks everywhere and always.
  • AIR CLEANERS—Keep elements clean—with solvent. Maintain proper oil level (if any).
  • FUEL FILTERS—Drain and clean element frequently.
  • MANIFOLD HEAT-CONTROL—Switch valve to summer position.
  • ENGINE—Wipe off heavy dirt and grease.
  • VALVES—Adjust timing and clearances with extra care.
  • BATTERIES—Watch electrolyte level. Water must be added more often in summer months.
  • TIRES—Keep air pressure what it should be. Check tires when they’re coolest—and don’t bleed them when they’re hot.

 

Releasing 76mm Shells for Active Duty

A simple trick for improving the 76mm ready racks in the M4 Sherman from Army Motors, February 1945:

Releasing 76mm Shells for Active Duty

UPSIDE-DOWNING YOUR TANK’S READY RACK AND SNAPPING OFF THOSE CLIPS IS WHAT DOES IT

If the 76mm, six-round ready rack or four-round ready rack on your medium tank (in the turret near the gunner’s seat) looks like the one shown in Fig. 1, here’s a simple fix to loosen the ammo.

The end clips (arrow in Fig. 1) hold the shells in the rack good and tight—too tight for fast unloading. So, loosen the top screw and remove the ammo container from the box (Fig. 2). Snap off the clips by bending them back and forth with a pair of pliers or cut the rivets with a sharp chisel. Then turn the box upside down, so the shell holes that were on top are now on the bottom, and slide it back into the rack (Fig. 3).

Repairing M4 Sherman Tank 76mm Ammunition Ready Rack

This is the important thing because inside the shell container there’s a spring that presses down on the shell, holding it firmly. That’s what makes the shell so hard to get out. When the box is turned over, the shell presses on the spring—the pressure’s gone and you can unload lots faster.

There’re several types of six-round ready racks (76mm), so be sure you work this only on the type rack that’s pictured.

 

Watch on the Rhine

The nine main causes for failures of U.S. Army GMC trucks were outlined on the back cover of Army Motors, Dec. 1944.

Watch on the Rhine -- GMC Truck Repair and Maintenance

THE 1ST ARMY POINTS OUT 9 THINGS TO
WATCH ON THE RHINE

… or anywhere else 2½-ton, 6×6 GMC’s are taking a beating. Whenever overloads are authorized, wherever long hauls or tough terrain are everyday stuff, you’ll do well to double-check these items the nine “main causes of failures” reported by the 1st Army from the Western Front.

1. CHECK VALVE CLEARANCES: INTAKE .012, EXHAUST .016

2. ADJUST CLUTCH-PEDAL FREE TRAVEL (TO 2½”)

3. KEEP FOOT OFF CLUTCH PEDAL EXCEPT TO START, SHIFT AND STOP

4. DON’T TOW WITH JUST A ROPE OR CHAIN. USE TOW BAR TO PREVENT FRONT-END DAMAGE TO TOWED VEHICLE

5. TIGHTEN RADIATOR HOLD-DOWN BOLTS

6. TIGHTEN TRANSFER CASE, TRANSMISSION & PILLOW-BLOCK MOUNTING BOLTS

7. TIGHTEN CAB HOLD-DOWN BOLTS

8. CLEAN & RE-OIL HYDROVAC AIR CLEANER

9. TIGHTEN BOLTS THAT HOLD BOGIE ASSEMBLY TO FRAME

ALL THIS—AND THE REST OF FORM 461, TOO!
 

How’s Your Sherman, Herman?

M4 Sherman Tank modification and upgrades from Army Motors, Maintenance Branch, Office of Chief of Ordnance, Vol. 5, No. 1, April 1944:

If it’s a Tank, Medium, M4—here are the visible changes that should have been made by now. Check your score—and chase whatever’s missing.

How is Your Sherman, Herman - U.S. Army M4 Tank Modifications and Upgrades

Sorry our list couldn’t quite Tell All. For details on the above additions, subtractions, and modifications, you’ll have to consult the TB’s and FSMWO’s themselves. There are plenty of other TB’s you should have seen, too—full of fascinating facts on M4 operation, identification, lubrication, adjustments, cautions, and assorted SOP’s.

You’ll find all these cataloged in the latest edition of OFSB 1-1, under “pertinent publications” for the Tank, Medium, M4. Anything else is impertinent, including that remark you just made about having so much to read.

Left, top to bottom: New towing shackle-pins FSMWO-G1-W7; New style combat safety lights. FSMWO G1-W9; Disc type track idler wheel. TB 1700-31; Idler brackets. TB 17538-4; Fuel tank filler necks, FSMWO G104-W63; Crowbar bracket relocation, TB 700-48; Mono-gyro control, FSMWO C56-W1; Turret traversing control cam, FSMWO G104-W55; Turret armor plate, FSMWO G104-W57; Azimuth indicator, FSMWO G104-W74; Ammunition rack protector plate, FSMWO G104-W81; Improved turret master switch, FSMWO G104-W82; Gunner’s periscope sight, FSMWO G104-W91; Combination spot and signal fight, FSMWO G104-W92; Smoke bomb thrower, FSMWO G104-W93; Tank commander’s vane sight, FSMWO G104-W94; Impulse firing solenoid, FSMWO G104-W97; Hydraulic hand turret traverse, TB 1731F-1; Lift hooks on gun shield, TB 1758-2; Propeller shaft U-joint tube. TB ORD 12; Track support roller spacer, FSMWO G1-W2; Bogie lift modification, FSMWO G27-W1; Bogie spring bottom seat, TB 700-32; Cast track support roller, TB 700-46**; Bogie wheel bearings and seats, TB 700-72**; Steel track replacement, TB 700-106; Bogie wheel tire sidewalls, TB 1700-36; Bogie and idler wheels (outside U.S. only) TB ORD 22; Hub sprocket capscrew, TB 700-70**; Latest type blackout driving light, FSMWO G1-W6.

Right, top to bottom: Fuel relief valve, FSMWO G104-W65; New type cam assembly, TB 700-52**; Magneto timing change, TB 700-53**; Oil filter replacement elemerts, TB 700-76; Fire detector system, TB 700-98; Interchanging master clutch, TB 731A-6*; Engine oil tank level gage, TB 731 A-7*; Fuel line and accelerator ccntrol rod, TB 731A-11*; Carburetor dust guard, TB 1700-18; Excessive clutch release pressure, TB 1700-35; Bendix-Stromberg carburetor, TB 1725-16; Carburetor economizer seats, TB 1730-1; Valve and magneto timing, TB 1750D-2; Valve and magneto timing, TB 1750D-3; Carburetcr air horn drain plug screens, TB 1751-1; Piston ring change, TB 1751-11; Sealing of engine shroud, TB 1751-12; Valve rocker arm clamp screw, TB 1751-13; Front main Dearing support, T3 1751-17; Autolite generator regulators, TB 731A-10*; Decontaminating apparatus, TB 700-58; Steering lever parking brake, FSMWO G1-W5; Driver’s and ass’t driver’s door lock, FSMWO G104-W75; Hatch guards, FSMWO G104-W83; Clutch pedal interference, TB 700-49; Instrument panel voltmeter, TB 700-68**; Transmission synchronizer assembly, TB 1700-19; Transmission pinion gear shim, TB 1700-22; Transmission clutch gears, TB 1700-23; Differential compensating pinion, TB 1750-4; Transmission oil pump, TB 1750-5.

*Superseded by TM 9-731A (23 Dec. 43)
**Included in TM 9-731A (23 Dec. 43)