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New Iliad Design Decal Sets

Two new WWII aircraft decal sets from Iliad Design have been announced: 1/32nd-Scale: 7./JG 53 Bf 109G-6 “Cartoon Aircraft” and 1/72nd-Scale: Early P-40s & Tomahawks.

jg53-decals decals-p40-tomahawk

 

A-26 Invader Armor Diagram

A-26 Invader armor diagram, from: Pilot’s Handbook for Army Models A-26B and A-26C Airplanes, AN 01-40AJ-1, August 1945, revised January 1946.

a26-invader-armor-protection-diagram

 

P-47 Pilot Preflight Check

P-47N pilot’s preflight check, from: Pilot Training Manual for the Thunderbolt P-47N, Headquarters, AAF Manual 51-127-4, Army Air Forces, Washington, D.C., September 1945.

p47-thunderbolt-preflight-check

Pilot’s Preflight Check

The preflight check starts before you reach your airplane. Survey the proposed taxiing route for any possible future obstruction, such as a fuel truck about to move. Study the ramp area for stray equipment or rubbish and rags that might be blown into the airscoop or tail assembly by prop blast.

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Airframe Album – Fw 189 Uhu

Valiant Wings Publishing has announced the sixth volume in their Airframe Album series: Airframe Album No. 6: The Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu, A Detailed Guide to the Luftwaffe’s Flying Eye by Richard A. Franks. According to the publisher, the book will include numerous historical photographs; detail pictures; detailed study of the structure, equipment and armament; isometric views by Wojciech Sankowski of prototype and production airframes; color profiles and camouflage details by Richard J. Caruana; and lists of all model kits, accessories and decals in all scales. List price is £16.95.

focke-wulf-fw189-uhu

 

P-61 Black Widow Cockpit

P-61 Black Widow cockpit instrument diagrams from the Pilot Training Manual for the Black Widow, P-61, Office of Assistant Chief of Air Staff Training, Headquarters AAF, Washington, D.C.

p61-black-wido-cockpit-front-panelControls, Switches, Instruments (Front Panel)

1. Remote compass
2. Airspeed indicator
3. Rate of climb indicator
4. Altimeter
5. Turn and bank indicator
6. Gyro horizon
7. Dials of automatic pilot
8. Pilot’s gunsight
9. Manifold pressure indicator
10. Oil temperature indicator
11. Oil pressure indicator
12. Carburetor air temperature indicator
13. Lower cowl flaps control valves
14. Upper cowl flaps control valve
15. Clock
16. Tachometer
17. Cylinder head temperature indicator
18. Fuel pressure indicator
19. Wheel and flap position indicator
20. Fuel gage
21. Oil cooler flap indicator
 

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B-32 Dominator

Introduction to the Consolidated B-32 Dominator heavy bomber from the training manual: Airplane Commander Training Manual for the B-32 Dominator, AAF Manual 51-126-7, Headquarters Army Air Forces, 1945.

b32-dominator

The B-32’s Past

The history of your B-32 Dominator starts in 1940, when the Army accepted Boeing, Martin and Consolidated Vultee designs for VHB aircraft. Martin designs were not completed, but the end results of those Boeing and Convair plans are the present B-29 and B-32 airplanes. Between the first 32 design and the airplane you’re flying today, however, is a long succession of changes.

The originally planned XB-32 was an airplane with several similarities to the present Superfortress. It had pressurization and remotely controlled turrets. It also had a double tail, wing guns and cannon, and other features which it doesn’t have today. The Army decided not to put all its eggs in one basket, but to have at first only one airplane with the new features of the 29, and to duplicate its purpose in another model of more conventional design.

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Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien / Ki-100 Book

kawasaki-ki-61-hien-fighterA new Kagero book release for November 2014 has been announced by Kagero Publishing: Monographs No. 58: Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien/Ki-100 by Leszek A. Wieliczko. The book contains 116 pages, 18 painting schemes, 105 archive photos, 19 pages A4 sheet of scale drawings, and two double A2 sheet with drawings.

 

A-26 Upper Turret Angles

Diagram of the upper turret fire interruption angles for the A-26, from: Pilot’s Handbook for Army Models A-26B and A-26C Airplanes, AN 01-40AJ-1, August 1945, revised January 1946.

a26-upper-turret-guns

This illustration shows the gunfire intercepting areas and the margins of interruption (approximately) and indicates the limits of gunfire from the upper turret for efficient use of the guns by flight personnel.

 

Short-Field Takeoffs in the P-61

Instructions for short-field takeoffs in the P-61 Black Widow reproduced from: Pilot Training Manual for the Black Widow, P-61, Office of Assistant Chief of Air Staff Training, Headquarters AAF, Washington, D.C.

short-field-takeoffs-p61-black-widow

SHORT-FIELD TAKEOFFS

Suppose you are on a field pitted with bomb holes. You must get off the ground as soon as possible. However, we’ll assume there are no obstacles to clear. Therefore, you do not have to pick up altitude quickly.

1. Make the usual pre-takeoff check.

2. Lower your wing flaps 2/3.

3. Line up for takeoff as close to the end of the runway as possible.

4. Run the engines to full takeoff manifold pressure (54″ Hg.) against the brakes.

5. Release the brakes and start your run, but keep the nosewheel on the ground as long as you can while picking up speed.

6. Pull the nosewheel off the ground and take off as soon as you have reached flying speed (75 mph at 29,000 lbs. gross weight). Then, raise the wheels and level off to attain critical single engine speed before climbing.

In short-field takeoffs, you may use your water injection system to increase the engines’ horsepower and help you get off sooner.

takeoffs-over-obstacles-p61-black-widow

TAKEOFFS OVER OBSTACLES

Fields bordered by obstacles generally are also short. To take off under these conditions, follow the procedure of a short-field takeoff, with the following exceptions:

1. Take off at the last possible moment.

2. After getting off the ground, raise your wheels and climb steeply until you have cleared the obstacle. Then level off to gain speed.

 

P-47 Pilot Equipment

Typical U.S. pilot’s personal equipment from Pilot Training Manual for the Thunderbolt P-47N, Headquarters, AAF Manual 51-127-4, Army Air Forces, Washington, D.C., September 1945.

Personal Equipment

On all flights, wear:
1. Helmet
2. Goggles
3. Gloves
4. Life vest
5. Parachute
6. Oxygen mask
7. First aid and emergency kit
8. One-man life raft (when flying over water)
9. Knife

The mask is worn on all flights to accustom you to it and to protect your face in case of fire. You wear gloves as a fire protection and to prevent skinned knuckles, which are inevitable without gloves. Use your goggles when needed. Do not wear commercial polaroid glasses. Use only government issue. The knife is carried to puncture your dinghy should it accidentally be inflated. It must be worn where it can be reached easily, preferably on the calf of your leg.

p47-pilot-personal-equipment