60-mm Mortar Emplacement

60-mm Mortar Emplacements from the Corps of Engineers’ field manual FM 5-15: Field Fortifications, U.S. War Department, February 1944.

60-MM MORTAR EMPLACEMENT.

a. Open type. This consists of a rectangular pit large enough to accommodate the mortar, the gunner, and the assistant gunner. The emplacement is kept to the minimum size to afford protection against airplane fire and bombing and against artillery shells, but it allows room for firing the mortar and storing necessary ammunition. The front edge is sloped so that the aiming stake, about 10 yards to the front, is visible through the sight and so the weapon’s fire will be clear. The spoil from the excavation is piled all around the pit to form a low parapet. Foxholes for members of the mortar squad not required at the gun are prepared not far from the emplacement. Additional ammunition is placed in nearby shelters.

60-mm Mortar Emplacement WW2

Figure 30. Open emplacement for 60-mm mortar. (Camouflage omitted.)

b. Two-foxhole type. This shows the 60-mm. mortar in action with only the base plate dug in, the crew operating from one-man foxholes. This two-foxhole type of emplacement is preferred when the mortar is in defilade.

60mm Mortar Emplacement and Crew, Foxhole and Slit Trench

Figure 31. Two-foxhole emplacement for 60-mm mortar. (Camouflage omitted.)

 

Learn to Recognize These Half-Tracks

Halftracks Recognition Poster

( Training Poster, U.S. Army Orientation Course )


 

December WWII Releases from Alpine

Alpine Miniatures: December WWII 1/35th and 1/16th Figure Releases

Continue reading December WWII Releases from Alpine

“Battleship X” is the USS South Dakota

After the Battle of Santa Cruz and Guadalcanal, “Battleship X” is identified as the USS South Dakota. Source: Newsmap, U.S. Army Service Forces, Army Information Branch, October 11, 1943.

“BATTLESHIP X” IS THE USS SOUTH DAKOTA

Because she was the first of a new class of battleships bearing new armament and possessing greatly increased firepower, official Navy communiques did not identify the warship which shot down 32 Jap planes during the Battle of Santa Cruz, Oct. 26, 1942, and sank three Jap cruisers off Guadalcanal Nov. 14, 1942. She was known only as the “Battleship X” until last week, when the Navy identified her as the USS South Dakota. She has three sister ships, the USS Massachusetts, the USS Indiana and the USS Alabama.

Battleship X is the USS South Dakota

Big 16-inch guns enable the South Dakota to knock off enemy ships before they can bring weapons within range.

Japanese Torpedo Bombers, Battle of Santa Cruz

These Jap torpedo bombers had visions of a second Repulse and Prince of Wales as they skimmed in toward the South Dakota. During the first enemy attack in the Battle of Santa Cruz, 20 out of 20 Jap dive bombers were shot down.

Battle of Santa Cruz, WW2, Pacific

Automatic Bofors and Oerlikon batteries of the South Dakota (center) and the carrier Enterprise (right) put up a shield of hot steel. The Enterprise and her planes accounted for 63 Jap planes during the Battle of Santa Cruz.

Quadruple Automatic 40mm Bofors

This is one of the quadruple automatic 40mm Bofors, mounted on a fast-swinging turret which brings its guns to bear on rapidly moving planes. The new battleships are covered with these 20mm Oerlikons and heavier pieces.

 

Academy 1/72nd IL-2M Shturmovik

Academy has announced a new highly-detailed 1/72nd-scale plastic model kit of the IL-2M Shturmovik with Cartograf decals.

Continue reading Academy 1/72nd IL-2M Shturmovik

Japanese Infantry Weapons

Japanese Infantry Weapons:

Japanese Infantry Weapons of World War 2

( Click to Enlarge )

Source: Newsmap, U.S. Army Service Forces, Army Information Branch, December 11, 1944.
 

How to Tow the Me 109 Fighter with a Truck

Me 109 Fighter - Towing Bf 109 behind Truck

"BF109 F-1 bis F-4 Flugzeughandbuch", May 1941.

 

Bofors Guns Concealment in Dummy Tent

Bofors Guns Concealment Dummy Tent

Source: Engineer-in-Chief’s Consolidated Intelligence Summary, Nos. 1-17, Headquarters, Australian Military Forces, May 1944.
 

P-47N Fuel System

P-47 Fuel System

Source: Pilot Training Manual for the Thunderbolt P-47N, Headquarters, AAF Manual 51-127-4, Army Air Forces, Washington, D.C., September 1945.

 

Aircraft Machine Guns

Caliber .30 and .50 Browning aircraft machine guns for aircraft from Index of Aeronautical Equipment with Navy and British Equivalents: Volume 5, Armament, March 1944.

AIRCRAFT MACHINE GUNS

Aircraft machine guns are used offensively or defensively against enemy aircraft or ground objectives, and are fired from fixed, flexible, or turret installations.

The caliber .30 and .50 Browning aircraft machine guns are recoil-operated, belt-fed, and air-cooled. Upon depressing the trigger, the gun operation becomes fully automatic, and it will continue to fire within the limit of the ammunition supply or until the trigger is released. Firing is accomplished manually by depressing the trigger, or electrically by a solenoid which is operated from a gun switch. The recoil of the gun supplies the power necessary to extract ammunition from the belt, feed it into the chamber, cock and fire the gun, eject the empty cartridge case, and move the next round into the feedway. Charging the gun for initial firing, or following stoppages, is performed manually, by retracting the handle of the slide group assembly, or remotely, by operating the control valve of a pneumatic or hydraulic gun charger.

These guns may be fed from the left or right side, and may be convened to either feed by reversing a few minor parts. A disintegrating metallic link belt is normally used to supply ammunition to the guns. The belt separates into individual links upon the removal of the loaded cartridge.

Guns may be mounted in the fuselage or in the wings, and require the use of gun mounts or adapters, depending upon the individual installation. When mounted to fire through the propeller arc, the gun must be equipped with a synchronizer, to prevent damage to the propeller.

Aircraft Machine Guns Armament Ordnance

AIRCRAFT MACHINE GUNS

INSTALLATION TYPES: BROWNING AIRCRAFT MACHINE GUN

CALIBER .30

• FIXED MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and operating slide group assembly)

• FLEXIBLE, WITH FIXED BACK PLATE, MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and retracting slide group assembly.) Used in turret installations.

• FLEXIBLE MACHINE GUN
  (Including flexible back plate and retracting slide group assembly)

CALIBER .50

• FIXED MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and operating slide group assembly)

• FLEXIBLE, WITH FIXED BACK PLATE, MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and retracting slide group assembly.) Used in turret installations.

• FLEXIBLE MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and operating slide group assembly)