P-47 Pilot Equipment

Typical U.S. pilot’s personal equipment from Pilot Training Manual for the Thunderbolt P-47N, Headquarters, AAF Manual 51-127-4, Army Air Forces, Washington, D.C., September 1945.

Personal Equipment

On all flights, wear:
1. Helmet
2. Goggles
3. Gloves
4. Life vest
5. Parachute
6. Oxygen mask
7. First aid and emergency kit
8. One-man life raft (when flying over water)
9. Knife

The mask is worn on all flights to accustom you to it and to protect your face in case of fire. You wear gloves as a fire protection and to prevent skinned knuckles, which are inevitable without gloves. Use your goggles when needed. Do not wear commercial polaroid glasses. Use only government issue. The knife is carried to puncture your dinghy should it accidentally be inflated. It must be worn where it can be reached easily, preferably on the calf of your leg.

p47-pilot-personal-equipment

 

Allied Uniforms

Allied Army, Navy, and Air Force Uniforms: Newsmap, U.S. War Department, March 1943.

WW2 Uniform United States

United States

British Empire Uniforms

British Empire

France WWII Uniforms

France

Uniforms WW2 Russia, Soviet Union, USSR

U.S.S.R.

Poland WW2 Uniforms

Poland

WWII Uniforms China

China


 

Military Courtesy to Ladies

“Courtesy to Ladies” from Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin, (“All Hands Magazine”), August 1944.

Courtesy to Ladies, U.S. Navy Sailors Military Courtesy

  • PROPER GREETING TO LADIES IS SALUTE
  • WHEN TALKING WITH A LADY ON STREET, REMAIN COVERED
  • IN WALKING TAKE POSITION TO LEFT OR OUTSIDE
  • WITH TWO LADIES, WALK OUTSIDE OR IN CENTER
  • IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, IT IS PERMISSIBLE TO REMAIN COVERED......
  • BUT IF OTHERS UNCOVER, YOU MAY FOLLOW THEIR EXAMPLE
  • IF A LADY STOPS AT YOUR TABLE, YOU REMAIN STANDING
  • ARM IS OFFERED TO A LADY ONLY WHEN ASSISTANCE IS NEEDED

 

Care of Clothing and Equipment

From The Ordnance Soldier’s Guide, 3rd Edition, Ordnance Replacement Training Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground:

RESPONSIBILITY FOR PROPERTY: Clothing and equipment issued to you are government property. If any articles are lost or damaged through your fault or negligence you will be required to pay for them. If you were responsible for the loss or damage, through fault or negligence, then you should admit that fact by signing a “Statement of Charges.” If, however, you believe that you were not responsible, do not sign this statement. In the latter case a “Report of Survey” will be made out and a Surveying Officer will determine whether or not you are to be held responsible. When articles of clothing or equipment have become worn out through ordinary wear and tear, no one is held responsible for the value and the worn articles may be exchanged for new ones.

WWII Care of Soldiers Clothing and Uniform in Basic Training

CARE AND CLEANING OF SHOULDER WEAPONS: Rifle and Carbine—Clean metal parts with sperm oil. Clean bore with rifle bore cleaner or G.I. soap and hot water. Treat stock and hand guards with linseed oil. Treat sling with neatsfoot oil.

WW2 Soldier's Care and Cleaning of Weapons and Equipment

CARE OF TENTING EQUIPMENT: Pegs: Do not hammer pegs into hard ground. Canvas: Brush and dry thoroughly before folding and storing. Rope: Wash thoroughly and dry before storing.

 

Luftwaffe Uniforms

German Luftwaffe Uniforms of WWII:

German Luftwaffe WW2 Air Force Uniforms

Air Force Uniforms: Officers and Enlisted Men

German WW2 Paratrooper Fallschirmjaeger Uniform

Air Force Uniforms: Miscellaneous

Source: TM-E 30-451: Handbook on German Military Forces, U.S. War Department, 1943.
 

Italian Navy Uniforms and Insignia

Italian Navy Uniforms and Insignia:

WWII Italian Navy Uniforms and Insignia

Continue reading Italian Navy Uniforms and Insignia

U.S. Army Camouflage Uniform

The rather rare U.S. Army camouflage HBT (herringbone twill) uniform being worn by soldiers of the 406th Infantry Regiment, 102nd Infantry Division during training. [Source: LoneSentry.com Collection.]

U.S. Army WWII HBT Camouflage Uniform, 406th Infantry Regiment, 102nd Infantry Division

© LoneSentry.com Collection

Continue reading U.S. Army Camouflage Uniform

Soviet Insignia of Rank

Soviet Insignia of Rank: Officers

Soviet Insignia of Rank: Non-Commissioned Officers

Source: Newsmap, U.S. Army Service Forces, Army Information Branch, February 1, 1943.
 

Coast Guards SPARS

Coast Guard SPARS

50 reasons for being a Spar

Coast Guard SPAR UniformSPARS do 50 different kinds of important jobs at U.S. Coast Guard land stations from San Diego to Cape Cod. They receive the same pay and promotions as Coast Guardsmen and are only limited in their service by the decision of Congress that they must serve ashore and within the United States. About half of them are petty officers.

The Coast Guard is the smallest and most versatile of Uncle Sam’s four armed forces. More than half of its men—an amazingly high percentage—are now on sea duty outside the United States. Among other things they chauffeur those seagoing armored taxicabs in which men and material are moved to invasion beachheads. Grim business!

More Coast Guardsmen are needed for overseas duty. But some men cannot be shipped out of key shore jobs until SPARS take over. The time to he a SPAR is NOW.

Qualifications

Enlisted SPARS are:  American citizens . . . between the ages of 20 and 36 . . . without children younger than 18 . . . All SPARS pass prescribed physical tests and have vision in each eye correctable to 20-20 . . . They have two years of high school or business college.

Rail fare of qualified applicants is paid to the nearest recruiting office for physical examinations.

Officer qualifications are the same except: age 20-50 and education two years of college plus two of business or professional experience.

WW2 Coast Guard SPARS

 

German Rifleman Uniform

The Handbook on German Army Identification was printed in 1943 by Military Intelligence Training Center, Camp Ritchie, Maryland. The handbook was designed to provide a reference manual for intelligence personnel in combat operations. The handbook included the following illustrations of a typical German army rifleman uniform.

German Rifleman – Deutscher Schütze:

German Rifleman Uniform WW2

Helmet, brim type, belt (Koppel), leather, buckle showing (Koppelschloss). Ammunition pouches, 3 each side, bayonet, short, sharp spade.

German Rifleman Uniform WW2

Gas mask over right hip, canteen (Feldflasche) and rations bag (Brotbeutel). Long trousers tucked into half-length boots.