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M15 40-ton Trailer

Illustrations of the M15 40-ton trailer from TM 9-767: 40-Ton Tank Transporter Truck-Trailer M25, War Department Technical Manual, U.S. War Department, February 1944. The M25 Tank Transporter, nicknamed the “Dragon Wagon,” was a heavy tank transporter and tank recovery vehicle used in World War II that was based on the M26 6×6 armored tractor and the M15 40-ton trailer.

m15-trailer-front-view-dragon-wagon

m15-trailer-rear-view-dragon-wagon

 

Head Control for Hull Machine Gun

Unique head control for the hull machine gun in the Panzer III. (Source: Preliminary Report No. 5, Pz Kw III, School of Tank Technology, September 1942.)

 

P-40 Pilot’s Ground Checks

Ground checks for the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk from Pilot Training Manual for the P-40, Headquarters, AAF, Office of Flying Staff, 1943.

P-40 Pilot’s Ground Checks

P-40 Warhawk Pilot Ground Checks

Before you get into your airplane, look it over closely. Walk around and inspect the wings, fuselage and control surfaces. Look carefully; take your time.

Before you climb into the cockpit be sure you have checked all of the following:

1. Check your tires and tailwheel. See that the struts have plenty of clearance. An instruction plate on each strut shows the necessary clearance.

2. Make sure the cover is off the pitot tube.

3. See that the covers are on the gun hatches.

4. See that the caps are fastened tightly on the gas, oil, and coolant tanks.

5. Make sure the Dzus fasteners are secure, and check the fairing on the entire ship for looseness.

6. Find out whether the propeller has been pulled through. It needs at least four turns if the engine is cold.

7. See that the wings and wingtips are not damaged.

8. Check canopy for proper tolerance.

 

SBD-3 Flying Characteristics

Basic flying characteristics of the SBD Dauntless from Pilot’s Handbook Model SBD-3, Douglas Aircraft, 1942.

Flying Characteristics

The model SBD-3 airplane is a single engine, low wing, monoplane, designed for dive bombing or scouting operations from either shore stations or aircraft carriers. This airplane performs all ground and flight maneuvers with the normal characteristics of its type. As a land plane, this airplane will take off from the ground or carrier deck with or without the aid of a catapult, and will land on an ordinary landing field with or without landing flaps, or on a carrier deck in an arresting gear. Dive bombing maneuvers may be made with or without the use of the diving flaps.

Douglas SBD Dauntless

Continue reading SBD-3 Flying Characteristics

Appe Tunisia Photos

Bundesarchiv photographs by Appe (Arppe?) arranged by negative number:

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P-38 Instrument Panel

Diagram of the P-38 Instrument Panel from Pilot’s Flight Operating Instructions for Army Models P-38H Series, P-38J-5 and F-5B-1, T.O. No. 01-75FF-1, September 1943.

P-38 Lightning Instrument Panel

Labels: 1. Directional gyro; 2. Gyro horizon; 3. Compass indicator; 4. Fuel pressure gages; 5. Altimeter; 6. Airspeed indicator; 7. Turn and bank indicator; 8. Rate of climb indicator; 9. Manifold pressure gages; 10. Suction gage; 11. Hydraulic pressure gage; 12. Turbo overspeed warning lights; 13. Ammeter; 14. Tachometers; 15. Coolant temperature indicator; 16. Fuel quantity gages; 17. Clock; 18. Combination oil pressure and temperature gages (fuel pressure indicator not connected); 19. Flap and landing gear position indicator; 20. Space for BC-608 Contactor; 21. Carburetor air temperature indicator.
 

P-51 Mustang in Full-Scale Wind Tunnel

A full-size P-51 Mustang in the Full-Scale Wind Tunnel at Langley Aeronautical Laboratory. (NASA Photograph.)

P-51 Mustang in Full-Scale Wind Tunnel at Langley
 

P-51B Mustang with Wing Gloves

A North American P-51B Mustang with wing gloves for research into low-drag performance in flight at Langley. Photograph courtesy NASA.

P-51 Mustang Research Wing Gloves
 

SBD Dauntless Cockpit

Photographs of the Douglas SBD Dauntless cockpit from the Pilot’s Handbook Model SBD-3, Douglas Aircraft, 1942.

Douglas SBD Dauntless Front Cockpit and Instrument Panel

SBD Dauntless Pilot Seat and Cockpit
 

Walther PP & PPK Police Pistols

The following report on the Walther PP & PPK Pistols was published in Foreign Military Weapons and Equipment, Vol. III, Infantry Weapons, Pamphlet No. 30-7-4, Department of the Army, 1954.

7.65-mm Walther Pistols Model PP and PPK
(WALTHER-POLIZEI-PISTOLEN W.PP & PPK)

Walther PPK Pistol

The Walther models PP and PPK were the official German police side arms from 1929 until VE-day. Both models were widely adopted by the police departments in numerous other European countries. They are almost identical in appearance, but the model PP is 5/8-inch longer and weighs 4½ ounces more than the PPK. A loading-pin indicator, similar to that found on the Walther P-38, is found on both models of this weapon produced prior to World War II, but on many wartime models of the PPK no indicator pins were furnished. Because of the excellent balance, dependability, and compactness these pistols were widely used by German military personnel. Both models are recognized by: (1) Their streamlined receivers; (2) a barrel which protrudes beyond the forward end of the slide; (3) and a barrel mounted solidly to the receiver.

Continue reading Walther PP & PPK Police Pistols