M3 Medium Tank Armament

Diagram of the armament and ammunition storage of the M3 Medium Tank. (Source: TM 9-750: Ordnance Maintenance, Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2, Technical Manual, U.S. War Department, May 1942.)

M3 Medium Tank Armament

 

Aircraft Machine Guns

Caliber .30 and .50 Browning aircraft machine guns for aircraft from Index of Aeronautical Equipment with Navy and British Equivalents: Volume 5, Armament, March 1944.

AIRCRAFT MACHINE GUNS

Aircraft machine guns are used offensively or defensively against enemy aircraft or ground objectives, and are fired from fixed, flexible, or turret installations.

The caliber .30 and .50 Browning aircraft machine guns are recoil-operated, belt-fed, and air-cooled. Upon depressing the trigger, the gun operation becomes fully automatic, and it will continue to fire within the limit of the ammunition supply or until the trigger is released. Firing is accomplished manually by depressing the trigger, or electrically by a solenoid which is operated from a gun switch. The recoil of the gun supplies the power necessary to extract ammunition from the belt, feed it into the chamber, cock and fire the gun, eject the empty cartridge case, and move the next round into the feedway. Charging the gun for initial firing, or following stoppages, is performed manually, by retracting the handle of the slide group assembly, or remotely, by operating the control valve of a pneumatic or hydraulic gun charger.

These guns may be fed from the left or right side, and may be convened to either feed by reversing a few minor parts. A disintegrating metallic link belt is normally used to supply ammunition to the guns. The belt separates into individual links upon the removal of the loaded cartridge.

Guns may be mounted in the fuselage or in the wings, and require the use of gun mounts or adapters, depending upon the individual installation. When mounted to fire through the propeller arc, the gun must be equipped with a synchronizer, to prevent damage to the propeller.

Aircraft Machine Guns Armament Ordnance

AIRCRAFT MACHINE GUNS

INSTALLATION TYPES: BROWNING AIRCRAFT MACHINE GUN

CALIBER .30

• FIXED MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and operating slide group assembly)

• FLEXIBLE, WITH FIXED BACK PLATE, MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and retracting slide group assembly.) Used in turret installations.

• FLEXIBLE MACHINE GUN
  (Including flexible back plate and retracting slide group assembly)

CALIBER .50

• FIXED MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and operating slide group assembly)

• FLEXIBLE, WITH FIXED BACK PLATE, MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and retracting slide group assembly.) Used in turret installations.

• FLEXIBLE MACHINE GUN
  (Including fixed back plate and operating slide group assembly)

 

A-26 Invader Noses

Douglas A-26 Invader Nose Sections from the Pilot Training Manual for the A-26 Invader, Headquarters, AAF, Office of Flying Safety.

A-26 Intruder Nose Section

Nose Section

The A-26 is an extremely versatile airplane. It is designed with two interchangeable nose sections to meet exact tactical requirements.

1. THE ALL-PURPOSE NOSE.

There are six combinations of armament, as follows:
a. Six .50-cal. machine guns. Crew 2.
b. One 37-mm. cannon and four .50-cal. machine guns. Crew 2.
c. One 37-mm. cannon and two .50-cal. machine guns. Crew 2.
d. Two 37-mm. cannon. Crew 2.
e. One 75-mm. cannon and one 37-mm. cannon. Crew 3.
f. One 75-mm. cannon and two .50-cal. machine guns. Crew 3.

2. BOMBARDIER NOSE.

Crew 3
Plexiglas nose.
Fitted with bombsight and controls, and two fixed .50-cal. machine guns.

 

M36 Tank Destroyer Armament

Summary of the armament of the M36 “Jackson” tank destroyer from the M36B1 technical manual TM 9-748: 90-mm Gun Motor Carriage M36B1, War Department Technical Manual, U.S. War Department, Washington D.C., January, 1945.

ARMAMENT CHARACTERISTICS

a. The armament on the 90-mm Gun Motor Carriage M36B1 is employed chiefly against enemy tanks and other ground objectives. The 90-mm Gun M3 is mounted in the turret. The turret can be traversed 360 degrees manually or by a hydraulic traversing mechanism. The 90-mm gun can be elevated 30 degrees and depressed 10 degrees.

M36 B1 Gun Motor Carriage

90-mm Gun Motor Carriage M36B1 - Three-quarter Right Front View

b. The cal. .30 machine gun in the front of the gun motor carriage on the right side is elevated and depressed manually, and fired by a conventional trigger. Refer to FM 23-50 for complete information on its operation.

M36 Jackson Tank Destroyer

90-mm Gun Motor Carriage M36B1 - Three-quarter Right Rear View

c. The cal. .50 machine gun is employed chiefly against enemy aircraft and is elevated and traversed manually, and fired by a conventional trigger. The machine gun can be traversed independently of the turret. Refer to FM 23-65 for the complete information on its operation.

Turret .50 Caliber Machine Gun

Cal. .50, HB, Machine Gun - Stowage Position

 

M36 External Travel Lock

Details of the external gun traveling lock mounted on the rear of the M36 “Jackson” tank destroyer from the M36B1 technical manual TM 9-748: 90-mm Gun Motor Carriage M36B1, War Department Technical Manual, U.S. War Department, Washington D.C., January, 1945. The travel lock was mounted on the rear engine deck, and the turret was traversed to the rear for extended travel. The travel lock latch is mounted off center and latches through a slot in the travel lock.

M36 B1 External Gun Travel Lock

GUN TRAVELING LOCK

a. Description. The gun traveling lock is hinged to brackets mounted on the rear engine compartment cover plate. To release the gun from the gun traveling lock, pull down on the release ring and, at the same time, raise the gun. To lock the gun in the gun traveling lock, hold the gun traveling lock jaws in a halfway open position and, at the same time, lower the gun into the gun traveling lock.

b. Replacement. Drive the lock pin from the right-hand side of each bracket. Drive both hinge pins from the brackets and remove the gun traveling lock. Position the gun traveling lock in the brackets and install the two hinge pins, making sure the lock pin hole in the hinge pin is in line with the lock pin hole in each bracket. Install the lock pin in each bracket.