MP 34 Bergmann Submachine Gun

The following report on the MP 34 9-mm Bergmann Submachine Gun was published in Foreign Military Weapons and Equipment, Vol. III, Infantry Weapons, Pamphlet No. 30-7-4, Department of the Army, 1954.

9-mm Submachine Gun MP 34/I (Bergmann)
(MASCHINENPISTOLE MP 34)

MP34 Bergmann Submachine Gun

This weapon is a development of the original German Bergmann machine pistol Model 1918. It was in wide use in the German Army and was also used extensively by U.S.S.R. It is the original of all blowback-type submachine guns and is the forerunner of practically every submachine gun manufactured today. It was adopted as the official submachine gun of the Swedish Army in 1937 and was widely distributed throughout Europe during the years immediately before World War II.

This weapon can be recognized by: (1) The cocking handle at the rear of the receiver; (2) the protruding magazine well on the right side of the receiver (on the Soviet Bergmann the magazine well on the left side of the receiver); (3) the automatic safety device placed behind the trigger to prevent firing of the weapon unless the cocking handle is locked down; (4) the cylindrical body tube which is threaded at the front end to receive the barrel and barrel jacket; and (5) the method of selective fire, i.e., slight trigger depression results in single fire, greater trigger depression results in full automatic fire.

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MP34 Submachine Gun (Steyr-Solothurn)

The following report on the MP 34 submachine gun was published in Foreign Military Weapons and Equipment, Vol. III, Infantry Weapons, Pamphlet No. 30-7-4, Department of the Army, 1954.

9-mm Submachine Gun MP 34 (Steyr-Solothurn)
(MASCHINENPISTOLE MP 34)

MP34 Submachine Gun Austria Steyr

This weapon was manufactured by both Austria and Germany during World War II. In the German Army it was used largely for rear-area troops. Prior to 1940, large numbers of this submachine gun were sold to Japan. It was replaced by the later and more advanced designs of submachine guns developed by the Germans. Models of this weapon stamped “MP 34 (o)” indicate that the weapon was issued for Austrian use and fired the long 9-mm Steyr cartridge. Models used by the Germans fire the 9-mm parabellum cartridge and were made with an attachment for mounting a bayonet on the right side of the barrel jacket.

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Submachine Gun Sounds

The original, authentic sounds of the U.S. M1928A1 Thompson, the U.S. M3 Grease Gun, and the German MP-40 “Schmeisser” taken from a WWII training film.


 

Schmeisser MP40 Submachine Gun

The following report on the Schmeisser MP40 Submachine Gun was published in Foreign Military Weapons and Equipment, Vol. III, Infantry Weapons, Pamphlet No. 30-7-4, Department of the Army, 1954.

9-mm Submachine Gun MP40 (Schmeisser)
(MACHINENPISTOLE M40)

WW2 German Schmeisser MP SMG Submachine Gun

This weapon is an improved version of the MP38 which was designed for use by parachute troops. Because of its simple construction and general reliability it was produced and issued in large quantities to all Army units. Of excellent design, these “machine pistols”, as the Germans called them, proved superior to all other types of German submachine guns and rapidly replaced all earlier weapons of this type.

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German Machine Gun Trick

The following intelligence report on an unusual German remote-controlled machine-gun position encountered by U.S. troops in Normandy was published in the Intelligence Bulletin, Vol. III, No. 4, December 1944.

GERMAN MACHINE-GUN TRICK

A U.S. staff sergeant, who served as an observer for a mortar section in the Normandy campaign, reports an unusual German method of firing a machine gun by remote control. Although this method has not been reported by other U.S. soldiers, and although no concrete evidence as to its effectiveness can be presented, the idea is noted here for what it may be worth as a sample of the German soldier’s ingenuity.

German WW2 Remote-Controlled Machine-Gun Trick

German Machine-gun Trick. A close-up of the machine gun, with, its pulleys. Riflemen-observers whistle signals to the gunner, to indicate Allied approach via point A. The gunner zeroes knot A, which trains the muzzle on point A. The cord arrangement for firing is not shown here.

The sergeant tells of inspecting a captured German machine-gun emplacement, which had been prepared in the highly novel manner illustrated in the figure. A rope had been attached to the butt end of the gun. This rope ran through pulleys set up on each side of the rear of the gun, so that movement of the rope would aim the gun in any lateral direction. The gun then was zeroed at certain positions in the field of fire, and these positions were marked by knots in the rope. Thus the gunner could aim the gun, and, by moving the rope back and forth, spray an area with bullets from a position out of the line of fire when the gun was attacked. The gun was fired by a trigger-and-cord arrangement not shown in the original field sketches.

The German machine-gun crew consisted of a gunner and two or three riflemen who served as observers and who reported to the gunner the particular point on the which the gun should be trained.

This machine-gun position appears impractical at best, and may be an incorrect report. The Germans however did produce a special periscopic aiming and firing apparatus for the MG34 and MG42 machine guns. U.S. ordnance reported on this device as the “Deckungszielgerät für le. 34 u. 42 Dezetgerät: Undercover Aiming and Firing Apparatus.”
Deckungszielgerät für le. 34 u. 42 Dezetgerät: WWII Undercover Aiming and Firing Apparatus for MG34 and MG42
 

More MG Ammunition at Hand

GI innovation from Combat Lessons, No. 6. Combat Lessons was published by the Operations Division of the War Department to give officers and enlisted men lessons from battle experiences of other soldiers.

GI innovation on M-3 submachine gun.

GI innovation on M-3 submachine gun.

More MG Ammunition at Hand

This innovation was reported from ETO: “Three 30-round magazines, taped together as shown in the photo, give the user of the M3 submachine gun 90 rounds of ammunition immediately available for use. Any one of the magazines can be inserted into the gun without being untaped from the other two.”